Author Topic: Wood Mounting??  (Read 6361 times)

Offline matt_hollis

  • Emerging!
  • **
  • Posts: 14
  • Karma: 0
    • View Profile
    • http://www.enoughforall.com
Wood Mounting??
« on: September 07, 2004, 06:23:58 PM »
Hey everybody,
I have a lot of issues with framing my 2 dimensional works and the only thing that has appealed to me is when I see 2D work mounted on wood.  So I was wondering if anyone could give me any advice on how to do this...like what glue to use or how to get it smooth.  I want to try this with some digital prints or watercolors.  Any imput would be great, thanks!
M

Offline Jesse

  • Administrator
  • Uber Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 12564
  • Karma: 47
  • Networking Art!
    • View Profile
    • jessecohen.com
PMA?
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2004, 08:41:40 PM »
What surface exactly are you mounting on?  I like PMA (Positionable Mounting Adhesive) because it is not 100 percent permanent.  Its a sheet that you put down and then use pressure to attach the adhesive.  If you put it down lightly, you can move the art again and press again.  It is nice since it doesn't use heat.  

If its not to heavy, good old 3M spray adhesive and a roller in both aplications would be used to smooth things once the art is down.  

I would opt for acid free archival adhesives.  which PMA is.

I found this on  the following site: http://www.reuels.com/reuels/page402.html

Quote
A dry, synthetic, easy-to-use, pressure sensitive adhesive. Allows repositioning of artwork until bond is made permanent. Just unroll PMA adhesive side up, position artwork, and cut the PMA flush or leave a narrow border for trimming. Place the artwork face up on the release paper, protect with slip sheet and rub with a squeegee or roller to transfer adhesive to back of the artwork. Remove the liner and position the adhesive coated artwork on the mounting surface. Cover with a slip sheet and rub with squeegee or use the C-35 PMA applicator for a permanent bond.



Or, I found this at http://www.art-boards.com/Archival%20mounting%20panel%206.htm:

Looks like a bit more of a pain in the ass than the PMA, but they give a nice description of how to mount paper or canvas to a board using their adhesive.  Hope these things help..

Quote
Art Boards™ Mounting Panels are Archival and Reversible.

For archival mounting of artwork, paper, & canvas. Mounting panel surface has a heat activated reversible archival adhesive. Art work is easily mounted or removed with heat and light pressure.  Mounting panel has slots in the back for easy hanging in either direction without the need for framing.

Offline matt_hollis

  • Emerging!
  • **
  • Posts: 14
  • Karma: 0
    • View Profile
    • http://www.enoughforall.com
mounting fun
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2004, 08:53:06 PM »
thanks for the reply,

so i want to mount on a thick piece of wood, with the sides flush with the artwork which might pose a problem since i don't have any wood cutting facilities in my studio..

when i have seen this technique done by other artists it almost looks as if they first mount the art to a thin board and then mount that onto a thicker piece of wood... i don't understand what the thin board's function would be in this setup...

Offline Jesse

  • Administrator
  • Uber Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 12564
  • Karma: 47
  • Networking Art!
    • View Profile
    • jessecohen.com
Archival mounting
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2004, 09:15:26 PM »
Mmmm.. probably the thin peice of wood provides a proper surface to mount your art work.  

There is a veneer of mahogany that is used for this, called luan that can be found at many art stores.  Typically it has been used as a surface for sets in the theatrical world, however, I have seen several artists to use it as a surface to paint directly on, or mount to.  
 
As far as tools go, from one thing to another, Life is about the right tools for the occasion.  

I'm sure you can find a way to do it with simple tools.  Maybe a dremel or something.  

I found one source in a google search for luan:

http://www.sohoartmaterials.com/

Offline matt_hollis

  • Emerging!
  • **
  • Posts: 14
  • Karma: 0
    • View Profile
    • http://www.enoughforall.com
laminating...
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2004, 10:46:52 PM »
Thanks again for your help Jesse....

i was searching around and someone talked about laminating onto luan, what is used to laminate onto something, polyurithane? exuse my spelling!

i will figure this out yet!

dns ynko

  • Guest
Wood Mounting??
« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2004, 08:20:27 PM »
matt we have a problem here. this is no good...let's think about it first. this is permanent, so anyone that might collect your work will be dealing with a piece of wood that can warp twist or ding over time. this is also not an acceptable method of mounting fine art. it does devalue the work. yes it is done, but it is not good and will ruin the artwork over a period of time.  it is also a tricky thing to use this material on a substrate that is not completely sealed.

i work in a frame shop that works with conservators on a regular basis. we deal with all of the museums in the area. i can tell you what will work, what is best and what will get by, and even how to do it. i will let you know how difficult a job is. mounting to wood...many tricks, that is why not many people do it, it has many faults.

ok without going into this anymore, tell me what you want...what look you are after and what it will add to your work, then i can try to help you come up with a solution.

dns ynko

Offline Jesse

  • Administrator
  • Uber Poster
  • ******
  • Posts: 12564
  • Karma: 47
  • Networking Art!
    • View Profile
    • jessecohen.com
Yeah..
« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2004, 10:52:18 PM »
Dns, yeah, that is a good point, about conserving the work,  the intention of just showing it for the sake of the exhibit or mounting archivaly for a collector.

A few years ago, I saw a show on 7th street where an artist mounted images against huge peices of drift wood with sheets of plexi roughly screwed through the front.  It looked nice, and the work was protected.

There is allways the old standard box mount with lamination, but that is far from alternative.

I would be excited to hear what you work out.